John P. Campbell

1802 - 1868

Cumberland Presbyterian Minister


1823
Candidate - John P. Campbell - October 8, 1823 - Elk Presbytery
John Campbell & Wm. B. Bryan came forward and related their experience of religion and their call to the work of the ministry and having testimonials of their good moral character and of their being regular members of the church and in the communion of the church the Pres. received them as candidates for the holy Ministry. (page 78)
Ordered that John Campbell prepare a discourse from Heb, 2 & 3, to be read at our next Pres. (page 79)
October 7-9, 1823 - Elk Presbytery - Cane Creek meeting house

[Source: Minutes of Elk Presbytery of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, October 7-9, 1823, pages 77-80]

1824
John Campbell read a discourse from Heb. 2 & 3 previously assigned him which was sustained as part of trial. (page 81)
Ordered that John Campbell prepare a discourse from John 3 & 36 to be read at our next Pres. (page 82)
April 6, 1824 - Elk Presbytery - Harpeth Lick meeting house, Williamson County, Tennessee

[Source: Minutes of Elk Presbytery of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, April 6-9, 1824, pages 81-83]

1824
John P. Campbell not mentioned in these minutes.
October 5-7, 1824 - Elk Presbytery - James Lowrie - Lick Creek, Bedford County, Tennessee

[Source: Minutes of Elk Presbytery of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, October 5-7, 1824, pages 84-93]

1825
John P. Campbell not mentioned in these minutes.
April 5-7, 1825 - Elk Presbytery - Snow Creek meeting house - Maury County, Tennessee

[Source: Minutes of Elk Presbytery of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, April 5-7, 1825, pages 93-98]

1825
John P. Campbell - Licensed - October 6, 1825 - by Elk Presbytery
Ordered that John P. Campbell read a discourse from 1st John 3c & 36v which was sustained as a popular discourse preparatory, to licensure. (page 103)
The Pres. of Elk having received testimonials in favor of John P. Campbell of his good moral character and of his being in the communion of the church proceeded to take the usual parts of trial for his Licensure and he having given satisfaction as to his aptness to teach, as to his experimental acquaintance with religion as to his internal call to the work of the ministry and as to his proficiency in divinity the Pres. did and do hereby " their approbation of all these parts of trial. And he having adopted the confession of faith of this church and satisfactory answered the questions appointed to be put to candidates to be licensed The Pres, did and do hereby licensed him the said John P. Campbell to preach the gospel of Christ as a probationer for the holy ministry within the bounds of this Pres., or where ever else god in his providence may cast his lotts. (pages 103-104)
October 4-6, 1825 - Elk Presbytery - McCurtian meeting house - Bedford County, Tennessee

[Source: Minutes of Elk Presbytery of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, October 4-6, 1825, pages 98-104]

1826
Ordered that John P. Campbell supply the Snow Creek. (page 105)
April 4-6, 1826 - Elk Presbytery - Hopewell meeting house - Bedford County, Tennessee

[Source: Minutes of Elk Presbytery of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, April 4-6, 1826, pages 104-106]

1826
Ordered that J. P. Campbell supply the Snow Creek Circuit until next Pres. (page 108)
October 3-5, 1826 - Elk Presbytery - Bear Creek meeting house - Maury County, Tennessee

[Source: Minutes of Elk Presbytery of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, October 3-5, 1826, pages 107-109]

1827
Ordered that John P. Campbell ride the Duck River Circuit until next Pres. (page 111)
April 3-6, 1827 - Elk Presbytery - Pleasant Grove meeting house - Maury County, Tennessee

[Source: Minutes of Elk Presbytery of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, April 3-6, 1827, pages 109-112]

1827
Ordered that Jn. P. Campbell supply the Snow Creek Circuit with preaching. (page 114)
October 2-4, 1827 - Elk Presbytery - Mt. Carmel meeting house - Williamson County, Tennessee

[Source: Minutes of Elk Presbytery of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, October 2-4, 1827, pages 112-115]

1828
John P. Campbell not mentioned in these minutes.
April 1-4, 1828 - Elk Presbytery - Lebanon meeting house - Rutherford County, Tennessee

[Source: Minutes of Elk Presbytery of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, April 1-4, 1828, pages 115-118]

1828
John P. Campbell not mentioned in these minutes.
June 24-25, 1828 - Hopewell Meeting House - Bedford County, Tennessee
[Source: Minutes of Elk Presbytery of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, June 24-25, 1828, pages 119-124]

1928
John P. Campbell not mentioned in these minutes.
July 22, 1828 - Harpeth Lick Meeting House - Williamson County, Tennessee
[Source: Minutes of Elk Presbytery of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, June 22, 1828, pages 124-131]

1828
Ordered that John P. Crawford prepare a discourse from John 8 & latter clause of the 24th verse and that he prepare to stand an examination on the usual parts of trial required by our Book of Discipline, preparatory to ordination, ordered that the Rev. Wm. S. Burney or in case of his absence Isaac Shook, preach the ordination sermon & that the Rev. James B. Porter or in case of his absence the Rev. Robt. D. King preside and give the change. (page 134)
October 7-, 1828 - Elk Presbytery - James Lowrie - Bedford County, Tennessee

[Source: Minutes of Elk Presbytery of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, October 7-9, 1828, pages 132-135]

1829
Ordination of John P. Campbell - April 9, 1829 - by Elk Presbytery
Pres. proceeded to take the usual parts of trial required by our Book of Discipline, in the case of John P. Campbell preparatory to ordination, all of which were sustained, and he preached a sermon from a text previously assigned him which was sustained as popular. The Rev. Robt. Donnell by request preached the ordination sermon from 1st Tim. 1st & 15th. and he having satisfactorily answered the questions appointed to be proposed to candidates for ordination the Pres. did by prayer and the imposition of hands set apart to the whole work of the ministry. The Rev. James B. Porter presided and gave the charge. (page 138)
April 7-10, 1829 - Mt. Pleasant - Maury County, Tennessee

[Source: Minutes of Elk Presbytery of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, April 7-10, 1829, pages 135-139]

1829
Member Present - Rev. John P. Campbell (page 140)
Rev. John P. Campbell was chosen Clerk. (page 140)
October 6-9, 1829 - Poplar Grove meeting house - Giles County, Tennessee

[Source: Minutes of Elk Presbytery of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, October 6-9, 1829, pages 140-144]

1830
Member Present - Rev. John P. Campbell (page 144)
April 6-10, 1830 - Fayetteville - Lincoln County, Tennessee

[Source: Minutes of Elk Presbytery of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, April 6-10, 1830, pages 144-150]

1830
Member Present - Rev. John P. Campbell (page 150)
October 5-8, 1830 - Cornersville - Giles County, Tennessee

[Source: Minutes of Elk Presbytery of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, October 5-8, 1830, pages 150-154]

1831
Member Present - Rev. John P. Campbell (page 155)
Elder Representative from Pond Spring Cumberland Presbyterian Church - William P. Campbell (page 155)
Member Absent - John P. Campbell on Monday, March 14 (page 158)
March 10-14, 1831 - Mt. Joy - Maury County, Tennessee

[Source: Minutes of Elk Presbytery of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, March 10-14, 1831, pages 155-159]

1832
Member Present - Rev. John P. Campbell (page 159)
Rev. John P. Campbell was chosen clerk. (page 159)
April 3-6, 1832 - Bear Creek meeting house - Maury County, Tennessee

[Source: Minutes of Elk Presbytery of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, April 3-6, 1832, pages 159-164]

1832
Member Present - Rev. John P. Campbell (page 165)
September 27-October 1, 1832 - McCains meeting house - Maury County, Tennessee

[Source: Minutes of Elk Presbytery of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, September 27-October 1, 1832, pages 165-169]

1833
Member Present - Rev. John P. Campbell (page 169)
March 21-23, 1833 - Franklin - Williamson County, Tennessee

[Source: Minutes of Elk Presbytery of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, March 21-23, 1833, pages 169-173]

1833
Member Present - Rev. John P. Campbell (page 175)
Ordered that John P. Campbell supply the Snow Creek. (page 179)
Whereas a number of candidates for the holy ministry under the care of this Psy. are seeking Literary preparation, and are without means to secure that object, Resolved that the Rev. John P. Campbell, be appointed to solicit means at discression wherever, they may or can be obtained, and that the Rev. H. H. Hill, be requested to assist in this work and report to the next session of this Psy. (page 180)

September 19-23, 1833 - Harpeth Lick meeting house - Williamson County, Tennessee

[Source: Minutes of Elk Presbytery of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, September 19-23, 1833, pages 175-180]

1834
Member Present - Rev. John P. Campbell (page 181)

March 20-24, 1834 - Mt. Pleasant - Maury County, Tennessee

[Source: Minutes of Elk Presbytery of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, March 20-24, 1834, pages 181-187]

1834
Member Present - Rev. John P. Campbell (page 187)
John P. Campbell a regular ordained minister of the gospel in the bounds of this Pry, but expecting to move out of her bounds, prays a letter of dismission and recommendation, Resolved therefore that his request be granted. (page 192)

Elk Presbytery met October 1-4, 1834 - Columbia - Maury County, Tennessee

[Source: Minutes of Elk Presbytery of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, October 1-4, 1834, pages 187-193]

 

We do not have the Minutes for Nashville Presbytery prior to 1853.

 

1854
J. P. Campbell - Nashville, Tenn.
Minister - Nashville Presbytery
[Source: Minutes of the General Assembly of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 1854, page 90]

 

1857
J. B. [sic: P.] Campbell - Nashville, Tenn.
Minister - Nashville Presbytery
[Source: Minutes of the General Assembly of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 1857, page 72]

 

1868
Rev. John P. Campbell was extensively useful in his early life in the work of the ministry. Although in later life less actively engaged in that work, he still loved it. A few weeks ago, at his home in the city of Nashville, in the triumphs of faith, he passed away.
[Source: Minutes of the General Assembly of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 1868, page 38]


In 1832 the Rev. H. H. Hill traveled in Alabama and Mississippi, holding meetings. His work was greatly blessed. The Rev. R. L. Ross was a convert of these meetings, as were his father and nearly all the family. In 1834 the Rev. W. S. Burney was engaged in holding camp-meetings in Mississippi. He was assisted by the Rev. A. P. Bradley, and their work was abundantly successful. Jefferson Brown, Joseph Harrison, and Cyrus Wilson all labored in this field about this time. Wilson was afterward a candidate for governor of Arkansas, but was defeated. Elam Waddell, Jabez Hickman, and F. M. Fincher came next. In 1838 the Rev. Richard Beard took charge of the Sharon Academy in Mississippi, and his influence and labors were a great help to the church in that State. James Mitchell, Andrew Herron, J. B. Jopling, Wayman Adair, and John P. Campbell, all preached in Mississippi during this period. Of all this list, only a very small number were free from secular pursuits. The New Hope Presbytery (1838) was united with the Columbus Presbytery in 1840, and then had among its members, Wayman Adair, Thomas Tabb, Joe Bell, James W. Dickey, W. C. Ross, F. E. Harris, Isaac Shook, and some others. Perhaps W. C. Ross is the only one of the list who still lingers on earth.
[Source: McDonnold, B.W. History of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Nashville, Tenn.: Board of Publication of Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 1888, Webpage ]


In 1833 the Rev. John P. Campbell had the pastoral charge of Mount Pleasant Church. I was then a boarding pupil in the village male academy. On the fifth Sunday of April he held a sacramental service at a Presbyterian Church one mile south of town, in order to accommodate the anticipated crowd, for the house was large. Brother Burney assisted him, and such was the effect of his sermon that day that the services were continued in town that night. The awakening was increased, and the meetings were continued with but little intermission until August, though moved sometimes to Mount Joy and back again; and once, or oftener, to a Methodist camp-ground near Mount Pleasant. The number of professions, as well as could be ascertained, was near 300.

It was during this revival, on Friday, June 12th, about 4 o'clock P.M., in Mount Pleasant, the writer, after several days of deep distress, obtained his hope in Christ. About two weeks afterward he was received by Brother Campbell (ever of precious memory) into the communion of that Church. To these two brethren he feels more indebted than to any others for his conversion.
[Source: The Cumberland Presbyterian, November 26, 1885, page 2, see webpage]


DEATH OF REV. J. P. CAMPBELL.


We are again called upon to announce the death of another venerable minister of the gospel. Rev. John P. Campbell, of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, died at his residence, No. 209 South Summer street, on the 5th inst., at 8 o'clock A.M. We copy from the city press the notices given concerning the melancholy event:

With sincere regret we chronicle this morning the death of Rev. John P. Campbell, a well-known Cumberland Presbyterian divine. He died in this city yesterday, after an illness of several months. Mr. Campbell was a kindhearted, Christian gentleman, and highly esteemed by all who knew him. In his death the Church has lost an ardent laborer, his family bereft of one who might be appropriately styled the paragon of goodness, and the city one of her most enterprising and useful residents. Truly do we condole with his relatives in the loss they have sustained.--Gazette.

DEATH OF REV. JOHN P. CAMPBELL.--This melancholy event, which had been anticipated by his friends, took place yesterday morning at 8 o'clock, at his residence on Summer street. But a few days ago he was canvassing our streets in behalf of the Pacific Railroad. Though age had set his signet upon his brow, and bleached his hair, none expected to be so soon called upon to lament his death. He was for many years a citizen of Nashville, and was ever foremost in promoting her advancement. He was a minister in the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and the author of a work of very considerable merit on "Christian Union." He leaves a large family, and many friends to mourn his death.--Union and Dispatch.

The Rev. John P. Campbell died at his residence, No. 209 South Summer street, yesterday morning. He had been, during the greater part of his life, a minister of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, was the author of several volumes, and was the first person who ever got out a directory for the city of Nashville. He was also connected with the Tennessee and Pacific Railroad project, for the success of which he diligently labored.--Rep. Banner.

Brother Campbell was in his 66th year--having been in the ministry about forty-four years. Few men were more consecrated, or more successful than he was in the early part of his ministry, as scores of persons now living can testify. He was a great revivalist; and hundreds have been added to the Church through his instrumentality.

His disease was dropsy of the heart, and most rapidly did it do its work. Still, the monster had no terrors for the faithful old soldier of the cross; for his death was a most triumphant one.

He loved to talk about his departure--would quote and comment upon the precious promises of the Bible. Indeed, his room for several days previous to his decease was a Bethel to the heart of every Christian who visited him! He had been chosen to deliver a Sabbath school address in Dr. Baird's Church, and when a friend said to him, "The children are anxious for you to get well, for they wish to hear that lecture," he said, "Tell the little children I will never see them again in this world, but I am going where there is a much larger class of precious little treasures, and I expect to recognize hundreds of them, and call them by name."

During his illness he often thanked God that he had been spared to see all of his children converted and brought into the Church, except one son, and said he, "God will save that son: I am confident of it." There was another item in his history that seemed to afford him great consolation in a dying hour, and that was, the kind and fraternal manner in which he had ever gotten along, not only with his own brethren in the ministry, but with the preachers in all the other Churches. Said he, "I have never had a difficulty with any of them--never tried in any way to injure one of them, or to wound their feelings in the least."

His funeral occurred on the 6th, at the First Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and though the afternoon was rainy and stormy, yet there was a large attendance. The ministry of other Churches participated in the solemn and impressive services, and to show how he was appreciated where he had lived long and was known well, let it suffice to say, many of the most prominent professional men in the city--lawyers, physicians, bankers, merchants, etc.--were present, and many were the tears shed on the occasion.
[Source: The Banner of Peace (Nashville, Tennessee), May 14, 1868, page 2]


Bibliography

Campbell, John P. Plea for Christian Union. Nashville, Tennessee: Published for the author, 1860. (We need 1 additional copy of this book for the archives)

 


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Updated November 16, 2015

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