Joseph H. Barbee

Cumberland Presbyterian Minister

1867 - 1934

We Need a Photograph


Rev. J. H. Barbee, Watertown, Dies While Preaching

The Rev. Joe H. Barbee, railway engineer since the Tennessee Central began operating and long known as a minister, dropped dead delivering the Sunday morning sermon at Bates' Hill Cumberland Presbyterian Church, Centertown, Cannon County, Sunday morning, Nov. 18.

Bro. Barbee was nearly through his sermon when he was seized with a heart attack. He was 67 years old. Many times, friends here said, he had expressed a wish "to die in the pulpit." He never pulled a train out of the yards without a prayer.

Known throughout Middle Tennessee and practically all towns along the Tennessee Central, not only as an engineer, but as a preacher, he made his home one mile from Watertown, where he owned a farm. A son, Joe D. Barbee, Nashville, is also an engineer for the Tennessee Central.

He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Nora Yelton Barbee, who has been ill at the home of her daughter, Mrs. John Ragland, Lebanon, Tenn., his son, Joe D., and a brother, Hatton, of Cookeville.

Funeral services were held Tuesday morning at Lebanon. Burial at Hearn cemetery, near Watertown.

Bro. Barbee had been a railway employee for 15 years. He was due to be retired within a few weeks.--Nashville, Tennessean.
[Source: The Cumberland Presbyterian, November 22, 1934, page 12]


1933
Barbee, Joseph H. - Watertown, Tenn.
Minister - McMinnville Presbytery - Tennessee Synod
Pastor - Union Hill Cumberland Presbyterian Church (session clerk lived in Sykes, Tenn.)
[Source: Minutes of the General Assembly of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 1934, pages 151 & 187]

1934
Barbee, Joseph H. - Watertown, Tenn.
Minister - McMinnville Presbytery - Tennessee Synod
Pastor - Union Hill Cumberland Presbyterian Church (session clerk lived in Sykes, Tenn.)
[Source: Minutes of the General Assembly of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 1934, pages 144 & 181]


Please Contact the Archives with Additions/Corrections

Updated July 16, 2010

HOME